Terrence Metz, CSM, PSPO, CSPF, is the Managing Director of MG RUSH Facilitation Training and Coaching, the acknowledged leader in structured facilitation training. His FAST Facilitation Best Practices blog features over 300 articles on facilitation skills and tools aimed at helping others lead faster, more productive meetings and workshops that yield higher quality decisions. His clients include Agilists, Scrum teams, program and project managers, senior officers, and the business analyst community among numerous private and public companies and global corporations. As an undergraduate of Northwestern University (Evanston, IL) and MBA graduate from NWU’s Kellogg School of Management, his professional experience has focused on process improvement and product development. He continually aspires to make it easier for others to succeed.

3 Steps to Conflict Resolution

4 Steps to Conflict Resolution: Purpose, Active Listening, Alignment, and Escalation

Resolve conflict within a meeting or workshop by understanding, clarifying, and confirming the purpose of the decision being discussed. Effective conflict resolution depends on shared purpose. Competing purposes will lead to competing solutions. There is no instructional class in the world that will teach you how to facilitate a resolution to all meeting conflict. Sometimes,…

Ground Rules Help Manage Meeting Behavior

Ground Rules and Ideation Rules for Optimal Group Behavior in Meetings

Use ground rules to help manage individual and group behavior during meetings and workshops. You can lead meetings and discussions without ground rules, but did you ever leave an unstructured meeting with a headache? The term “discussion” is rooted similarly to the terms “concussion” and “percussion.” A little bit of structure will ensure that you get more…

Addicted To Being Right Requires Balance

Addicted to Being Right: 4 Participant Responses to Avoid Being Wrong

Most people associate shame or loss of power with being wrong. Ever feel yourself getting defensive?When your meeting participants turn defensive, especially when they feel they are losing ground, neurochemistry hijacks the brain. Because they are addicted to being right, the amygdala, our instinctive brain, takes over.  With a focus on being right, participants are…

Becoming an Unconsciously Competent Facilitator

To become an unconsciously competent facilitator, you first become conscious and then competent. As you progress and increase your abilities, you will note an evolution of competency, illustrated in the chart below. First, note that consciousness precedes competence. You do not achieve a consistent level of success until you have developed consciousness about what is required. Secondly, you will discover…

Premier Facilitators

Twelve Behaviors that Define Great Facilitators

  Today we bring you twelve significant behaviors that define successful, professional facilitators. (ie, GREAT Facilitators) Our scope focuses on structured facilitation (NOT Kum-Bah-Yah). Structured facilitation requires a balanced blend of leadership, facilitation, and methodology. (An alpha sort sequences the following, not order of importance). The first three behaviors: 7:59 AM preparation and interviews 
(ie, managing expectations and ownership).…

RACI - Roles and Responsibilities

How to Transform a Roles and Responsibility Matrix into a GANTT Chart

Here’s how to create a Gantt chart or basic timeline when your discussion or meeting deliverable includes assignments for actions that have already been built or identified. As a result of capturing the additional inputs below, you develop consensual understanding from your group’s roles and responsibility matrix (RACI or RASI or LACTI). (1) WHO will take…

Dial Up Decision Quality with More Diverse Teams

Four Reasons You Will Dial Up Decision Quality with More Diverse Teams

Decision quality increases with the number of available options. The MG RUSH technique has long promoted the concept of teams to improve decision quality.  Most understand that properly facilitated teams are smarter than the smartest person on the team, especially with diverse teams. Teams create more options than aggregating individual inputs. Diverse teams push even…