Overconfidence

How Experience and Qualifications Amplify the Fallacy of Planning (i.e., “Overconfidence”)

Research by Ana Guinote and Mario Weick shows that people in positions of power are particularly ineffective planners. People who feel powerful focus on getting what they want and ignore the potential obstacles that stand in the way. Here is the fallacy of planning: the planning efforts of powerful people rely frequently on “best case…

Scenario Planning Support

National Intelligence Council Support for Facilitating Scenario Planning

The FAST Professional Advanced Facilitative Leadership training covers a methodology and explains the need for facilitating scenario planning. Therefore, if you find yourself in that role, consider purchasing the USD$2 Kindle version of “Global Trends 2030: Alternative Worlds” to support your methodology and preparation. Future Scenarios For instance, Robert Moran’s excellent summary can be found…

Executing Your Strategy

Facilitators’ Overview of the HBR Book Executing Your Strategy

Executing Your Strategy was published by Harvard Business School Press and written by two MG RUSH alumni. The tightly woven book provides instruction on how to transform strategy into projects. Writers Morgan and Malek (both previously professors at Stanford University), spoke with us about the importance of professional facilitation to both “plan your work” (strategy) and…

Chairing Meetings

16 Valuable Tips and Considerations when Chairing Meetings

Many skills required to facilitate also apply to chairing meetings. Success begins with vision and meeting vision comes alive by articulating the purpose, scope, and objectives in advance.  Other considerations that support successful facilitating or chairing rely heavily on people skills such as: Ability to trust in the good nature of the human spirit, even in high-risk situations…

Eight Meeting Purposes

8 Meeting Purposes – What Tasks Are You Asking a Group to Complete?

Effective meetings are first based on clear line of sight to an end result, preferably something that can be documented.  Yet all too often meeting purposes rely on determining WHAT the deliverable should be. Consequently, using meeting time to determine the meeting deliverable indicates unclear thinking and weak methodology.  As a result, see the eight most common reasons…