Support for Arguments

How to Make Thinking Visible — Three Forms of Business Argumentation Support

One prevailing reason for how to categorize input relies on common purpose. Most enterprises organize around common purpose. For example, treasury operations organize around the purpose of financial capital; human resources organize around the purpose of human capital; and marketing organizes around the purpose of products and services. Force your participants to make thinking visible.…

Argumentation Relies on Facts, Presumptions, Assumptions, and Probabilities

Understand the Value of Argumentation for Organizational Decision-making

A strong facilitator should understand and appreciate the value of argumentation. She should understand the holarchial nature of business and people organized around a common cause. Critical thinking helps structure discussions so  groups can get more done, faster. In 1962, when Thomas Watson (CEO of IBM) was helping IBM reach their pinnacle, he said: “I…

Political Risks in Meetings --- Interviewing Questions

Interviewing Questions to Ask to Understand Political Risks in Meetings

Interview participants to understand as much as possible about them, the people they work with, and their business. To understand the political risks in meetings, speak with your participants. Preferably, sit with them one-on-one for about 30 minutes. Speak with each face-to-face, or at least by way of a teleconference. Political Risks in Meetings — Interview…

Three Forms of Persuasion

What Aristotle Might Say to Facilitators Who Cannot Remove Bias

Argumentation can be described as the SMart approach to persuasion. It combines appeals to logic, or the Scientific Method, along with an appreciation of artistic attributes that that make the appeals more persuasive and convincing. Specifically Aristotle discusses three drivers of persuasive success: Ethos, Logos, and Pathos. Good facilitators ought familiarize themselves with all three. Here’s…

Structuring Meetings

Compelling Reasons for Structured Meetings | Positive Impact on Stakeholders

The dynamism of business wisdom demands the application of knowledge, stuff you find ‘in−formation’ (not static). Compound those dynamics with the challenge of organizing a group of people. Groups of people fail (or operate at sub-optimal levels) either because they don’t care, don’t have the talent, or don’t know how. Structured meetings and facilitation training…

Clear Thinking

Facilitation Secret Sauce – Clear Thinking, Active Listening, & Structure

The facilitation secret sauce to leading more effective meetings and workshops reminds us to put a CAP on wasted time and energy by embracing three behaviors: Clear thinking (ie, yields consciousness) Active listening (ie, yields competence) Prepared structure (ie, yields confidence) The effective meeting leader learns to cap waste—to maintain control over direction, environment, and…