Keeping Groups Mentally Sharp

Challenge the Status Quo, such as “We don’t do things that way around here.”

Those of you familiar with the MG RUSH curriculum remember the challenge of the “bookworm” exercise that only one or two students get correct per year. Here is another similar, quickly run challenge to test groups resistant to change or inclined to simply “vote on things.” Remember, Challenge the Status Quo. Framing Answer Add an “A”…

People Learn Differently

The Way People Think Affects How You Intervene to Build Consensus

Differences — People think differently. As session leader, you empower participants and their ability to understand and communicate with each other. Additionally, you enable them to think creatively about their business. Hence, the following two subjects deal with the way people think—horizontal/ vertical thinking and paradigms. Horizontal/ Vertical Participants in a workshop argue over a seemingly…

14 Typologies to Avoid

14 Facilitator Typologies to Avoid (Humorous, Although Uncannily Real)

Here is a quick and somewhat humorous listing of fourteen different facilitator typologies or “personalities” you might seek to avoid. Our favorite is “The Pretender.” The “I Can’t Hear You” Guy— The facilitator who refuses to listen, probably because they are too busy analyzing, judging, and processing information. The Blabber— The facilitator who loves the…

Same Height?

Be on Guard for Selective Perception and other Meeting Participant Biases

Guard against selective perception.  As their session leader, remember that everything heard in a meeting or workshop is interpreted and filtered differently by participants. They will hear or see differently based on their individual biases, or colored lenses. To illustrate the point, the vastly different pictures below are all from the same area in space…

How to Actively Listen Relies on Reflection

The Four Steps to Active Listening – Strive to Reflect Rationale

Active listening captures one of the most important aspects of effective facilitation. As an active listener, you feedback (emphasize, restate) what the speaker has offered to the group, and more importantly, why. Be sure to reflect the rationale, the ‘because’ behind the speaker’s main point. Active listening serves several purposes: Often, the participant is formulating…