Range of Meeting Leadership Styles

Understanding the Time and Place for Individual Versus Group Decisions

The continuum of leadership behavior provides one context for understanding the best time and place for individual decisions versus group decisions. That continuum, as illustrated below, ranges from the completely subordinate-centered approach to the completely leader-centered approach. In between these extremes are another four types that blend or offset the “center” perspective. Both approaches can…

Balanced Scorecard

Balanced Scorecard Demands Strategy-Focused Facilitation

Five principles of successful organizations emerged from Kaplan and Norton’s research on successful Balanced Scorecard adaptors. The five principles describe the key elements of building an organization able to focus on strategy and deliver breakthrough results, and they depend heavily on effective facilitation and group ownership. The nineties are arguably the most worldwide productive in…

Workshops Versus Meetings -- Support the Life Cycle of Projects and Other Initiatives

Reasons for the Difference between Meetings and Workshops

If it seems that workshops are actually well-run meetings, that is true to a certain degree. Facilitated workshops and well-run meetings are very similar. The main differences between meetings and workshops are: Meetings Primarily intended to inform by exchanging information Agenda steps are frequently time-boxed Tending to have informally defined roles and a non-neutral leader…

9 Components of a Structured Meeting or Workshop

A facilitated structured meeting or workshop provides an environment designed to extract high-quality information in a compressed timeframe. A structured meeting uses visual aids and a team environment to accelerate projects and amplify the quality of the decisions, outputs, deliverables, and outcomes. Therefore, the major components of the MG RUSH facilitative structured meeting technique include: A model life cycle…

Meeting Introduction, Why Individual Decisions are Made

Neuroeconomics and Neurofacilitation: Rational Decisions Maximize Utility

World scientists are striving to map activity in the human brain. Presumably, a map of neural activity will shed light on how the brain works and how choices are made. Concurrently, there has been an upsurge in related fields seeking to understand human nature and behavior change: neuroaccounting, neuroeconomics, neurotics, neurofinance, neuroleadership, neurolinguisics, neuromanagement, neuromarketing,…

Illustrative SIPOC: Planning Agenda Yielding Who Does What by When

A Simple Planning Agenda for Agreeing on WHO Does WHAT by WHEN

Any type of descriptive or prescriptive plan, process, or series of activities can then be illustrated with a simple process flow diagram. A process flow diagram describes WHO does WHAT by WHEN, in support of some agreed upon purpose. Therefore, here is a simple method you can use as your planning agenda. Rationale for Agreeing on a Simple Planning Agenda Groups…

Decision-Making Leadership

Decision-Making: Focus on Strategic, Operational, OR Tactical Issues

Scope creep wreaks havoc on projects and decision-making. Meetings also spin out of control because the leader allows the co-mingling of strategic, operational, AND tactical issues. Each deserves a different approach, preparation, and decision-making. Do NOT allow your meetings to jump back and forth between different issue types. Many people spend a large portion of…

Design Thinker

A Facilitator’s Profile is Much Like an Innovator’s Profile (Design Thinker)

“Contrary to popular opinion, you don’t need weird shoes or a black turtleneck to be a design thinker . . .” so goes the article from Harvard Business Review June 2008 (pg 87). The author suggests five characteristics found in design thinkers (ie, innovators) that relate uncannily to core competencies required for effective facilitation.  Included…