Subject Matter Experts

Do Facilitators Need to be Subject Matter Experts? Content vs. Context

Some of the best facilitators are NOT Subject Matter Experts within the topic and scope of the discussion; however, NOR can they afford to be subject matter ignorant. They need to be subject matter conversant and understand the terms being used and the relationship of those terms to the deliverable, but they do NOT have…

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Decision-Making Leadership

Secret Sauce Part 3: Clear Thinking, Active Listening, and Prepared Structure

The secret to leading more effective meetings and workshops reminds us to put a CAP on wasted time and energy by embracing three behaviors: Clear thinking (ie, yields consciousness) Active listening (ie, yields competence) Prepared structure (ie, yields confidence) The effective meeting leader learns to cap waste—to maintain control over direction, environment, and contributions of…

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Active Listening

Secret Sauce Part 2: Clear Thinking, Active Listening, and Prepared Structure

The secret to leading more effective meetings and workshops reminds us to put a CAP on wasted time and energy by embracing three behaviors: Clear thinking (ie, yields consciousness), Active listening (ie, yields competence), and Prepared structure (ie, yields confidence). The effective meeting leader learns to cap waste—to maintain control over direction, environment, and contributions of meeting participants.…

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Clear Thinking

Clear Thinking, Active Listening, & Prepared Structure are the Secret Sauce

The secret to leading more effective meetings and workshops reminds us to put a CAP on wasted time and energy by embracing three behaviors: Clear thinking (ie, yields consciousness) Active listening (ie, yields competence) Prepared structure (ie, yields confidence) The effective meeting leader learns to cap waste—to maintain control over direction, environment, and contributions of…

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Structuring Meetings vs. Workshops

Differences Between Meetings and Workshops – Structure

If it seems that workshops are actually well-run meetings, that is true to a certain degree. Facilitated workshops and well-run meetings are very similar. The main differences between meetings and workshops are: Meetings Primarily intended to inform by exchanging information Agenda steps are frequently time-boxed Tending to have informally defined roles and a non-neutral leader…

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9 Components of a Structured Meeting or Workshop

A facilitated structured meeting or workshop provides an environment designed to extract high-quality information in a compressed timeframe. A structured meeting uses visual aids and a team environment to accelerate projects and amplify the quality of the decisions, outputs, deliverables, and outcomes. Therefore, the major components of the MG RUSH facilitative structured meeting technique include: A model life cycle…

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Successful Meetings Demand Collaboration and Avoid Poor Facilitation

Meeting Impact: Poor Facilitation Leads to Problems, Struggles, and Errors

A primary concern in meetings and information gathering activities is getting good information—to build the right product the first time—and to make well-informed decisions. Significant trends show that groups are embedding the role of ‘facilitator’ in the culture and health of modern, especially holistic, organizations.  Therefore, take strides to avoid poor facilitation. “Perversely, organizations with…

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Facilitative Leadership Benefits

Application, Scope, and Facilitative Leadership Benefits

Facilitative leadership benefits are best realized for projects and teams where the leader is coordinating competent specialists in complex situations. The best leaders are flexible because both command control and facilitative leadership have their place. Participants should come to understand that they could shift to a facilitative mode once their staff possesses the capacity to work…

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The Facilitative Leadership Difference

Nine Characteristics of the Facilitative Leadership Difference

We seek primarily to shift the thinking of our readers from facilitation (as a noun or a static way of being) to facilitating (as a verb or a dynamic way of doing). Therefore, truly making it easier for meeting participants to make more informed decisions. Facilitating creates value because the method encourages speaking with people rather…

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An ever-changing world

Change or Die —“It is NOT the strongest of the species that survives . . .

“It is NOT the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” (Charles Darwin) Therefore, change or die. Our approach to meetings and workshops reflect the necessity to change. In fact, most people do not even change their minds—rather, they make a new decision based on…

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